JRRVF Page principale
Forum Forum - page principale Aller à la section
Membres Inscription Votre profil Recensement
Fuseaux Moteurs de recherche Les derniers fuseaux Archives
Section « Tolkien sur JRRVF et les médias (sites internets, presse écrite, ...) »
Fuseau « Le Trône de fer - article du Point »
Atteindre la fin du fuseau
Le Trône de fer - article du Point
- Les messages -
Yyr
Click Here to See the Profile for Yyr   Cliquer ici pour écrire à Yyr  

le 09-04-2012
à 20:31


— Ah il a dit ça Thomas Mahler ? Eh bien, tu sais ce que je pense, moi, de Thomas Mahler ?
— Cœur, si tu veux être grossier, va le faire ailleurs !
— Parfaitement ! ... Réunion du Conseil ! Immédiatement !

On vient de me montrer cet article du Point, n°2064, du jeudi 5 avril 2012, dont je vous laisse prendre connaissance.

Ensuite, je propose que nous allions au Point pour leur montrer, qui, des Belges ou de nous, sont les plus braves ... Heu ... je m'égare :)

Laegalad
Voir le profil de Laegalad   Cliquer ici pour écrire à Laegalad  

le 09-04-2012
à 21:52

Farpaitement !
lambertine
Voir le profil de lambertine   Cliquer ici pour écrire à lambertine  

le 09-04-2012
à 23:31

Oui, quoi ? C'est qui qu'on est les plus braves ?

(Blague à part, c'est très bien, le Trône de Fer...)

Yyr
Voir le profil de Yyr   Cliquer ici pour écrire à Yyr  

le 10-04-2012
à 10:57

Lambertine a dit :
Oui, quoi ? C'est qui qu'on est les plus braves ?
Oups :)

Feuille de Niggle
Voir le profil de Feuille de Niggle   Cliquer ici pour écrire à Feuille de Niggle  

le 10-04-2012
à 15:56

Je ne connais pas grand chose de cette saga, mais on dirait que l'auteur de l'article n'en connaît pas beaucoup plus sur l’œuvre de Tolkien...

La Terre du Milieu, un univers manichéen?!

Pellucidar
Voir le profil de Pellucidar   Cliquer ici pour écrire à Pellucidar  

le 10-04-2012
à 18:29

Je n'ai pas encore lu les bouquins (je suis occupé à "finir" La Roue Du Temps) mais j'ai pu voir la première saison complète de l'adaptation télé… Et c'est très très bien. Très beau casting en général, et Sean Bean en particulier est encore une fois parfait.
Quant à l'article du Point, j'ai l'impression de relire tout le temps le même, dès qu'une nouvelle série a un peu de succès (Eddings, Jordan, …) : blablabla nouveau Tolkien, blablabla fantasy dans l'âge adulte, …
Laegalad
Voir le profil de Laegalad   Cliquer ici pour écrire à Laegalad  

le 10-04-2012
à 21:30

C'est très bien, mais dans le genre tragédie, malheureusement... du coup je me suis arrêtée au premier tome des intégrales (on connaît mon goût pour les histoires qui finissent mal ; je réécrirais tout le scénario pour que les personnages arrêtent de se comporter de façon stupide ^^). Mais c'est dommage, l'univers est vraiment sympathique !
ALDARIL
Voir le profil de ALDARIL   Cliquer ici pour écrire à ALDARIL  

le 11-04-2012
à 01:35

Je confirme, la saga de George RRR Martin est excellente, c'est très bien écrit ! Et la série fait honneur au livre; Concernant la roue du temps, je dois dire pour la critique, mon dieu que c'est long et qu'il y a des longueurs, surtout les derniers tomes. Mais sinon, c'est une saga agréable: ça ne vaut pas le Seigneur des Anneaux.

Par contre, s'il fallait décerner la médaille d'argent, se serait à la saga du trône de Fer
L'or, bien entendu à l' oeuvre de Tolkien
le bronze, pour Robert .Howard, le créateur de Conan le barbare.

jean
Voir le profil de jean   Cliquer ici pour écrire à jean  

le 11-04-2012
à 09:42

ci dessous la critique de cette semaine dans "the independent" désolé c'est en anglais sur jrrvF.


News | 'Game of Thrones' is back on the box from tomorrow and Tim Lott explains why its blend of swords, sorcery and sex is such a winner
In my part of north-west London, the return of Mad Men caused many a French wooden shutter to tremble in anticipation. Me, I've got off-the-peg curtains - my tastes are more basic. Give me a sword, a dragon and a zombie any day - hence my excitement is reserved for the return of George R R Martin's Game of Thrones on Sky Atlantic tomorrow.
I will now put myself further to shame among my sophisticated neighbours by confessing that my all-time most enjoyable novel is not Sartre's Iron in the Soul, or Pynchon's V, but Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings. Yes, it is badly written. I agree that the characters are paper-thin and the women sexist stereotypes. But what a plot! What a spectacle! What simple, innocent, Boy's Own excitement!
Ever since I read Tolkien's masterpiece - at the age of 14, five times, actually - I have been hoping for a worthy successor. It has never arrived. Harry Potter is not fit to groom Gandalf's beard.But when I tuned into the first series of Game of Thrones last autumn, I knew my search had ended.
For those not aware of the story - well, it's complicated and involves a series of feuding families, notably the Lannisters, the Starks and the Baratheons, in an imagined world called Westeros. They compete for power from a series of seats inprovincial stronghold empires.Meanwhile, across the sea, with the Dothraki, vicious horse-riding ur-Mongols, the usurped Queen Daenyris Targaryen, plots her return to the throne vacated by the usurper, the late King Robert Baratheon (who died, not unexpectedly, in suspicious circumstances). What's more she has dragons -albeit only three very small ones.
The dragons, although not an afterthought, have not yet been central to the plot.Magic and the supernatural are mentioned and occasionally hinted at, but otherwise George R R Martin is naturalistic in his approach. The subject of the series is not magic, but politics, and rarely will you see a more cynical take on the machinations of power outside The Sopranos.
The Lord of the Rings was about good and evil. Game of Thrones is largely about evil. Practically every character is treacherous, vicious or untrustworthy. The only clan member who isn't an anti-hero, the principled Lord Eddard Stark, had his head - shockingly - chopped off by Joffrey, the psychopathic son of the dazzling beautiful but evil Queen Cersei Lannister (inset left) at the end of the first series. All that are left now are sullied or impotent characters.
Presumably Martin is going to have to find himself at least one hero for us to identify with, but it's quite hard to work out who it's going to be. The bastard son of Eddard may play the part - but he is in exile and cannot participate without breaking his sacred knightly vows.
What else makes Game of Thrones so compulsive? Well, sex, for a start. The scheming Lord Littlefinger runs a tidy franchise of brothels, and the boudoir scenes in which he trains his charges are as good as TV soft porn gets. And the impish dwarf, Tyrion Lannister - who has all the best lines - is a sex addict in a world where helplines have yet to be invented.
The violence is brutally, brilliantly choreographed, and the sense of spectacle overpowering. If you, like me, think a zombie with a big sword beats the slow unfolding of plot and gentle nuance of character every time, then this is the series for you.
Tim Lott's novel, Under the Same Stars, is published by Simon & Schuster. Games of Thrones is aired on Sky Atlantic from tomorrow
Verily, you have not experienced convolution until you've taken a televisual wander around Game of Thrones' mythical Westeros, a continent of endless internecine warfare and men in furs. But for those non-fanboys nervous about entering the fantasy fray with series two, we arm you with a rundown of the show's main families:
House of Baratheon
Aka, the ruling ones. The untimely death of Mark Addy's burly King Robert means the all-important Iron Throne is now occupied by his less burly son, tyrannical stripling Joffrey (inset). Who is not in fact his son but the incestuous spawn of Robert's wife, Queen Cersei Lannister, and her brother Jaime. As is the way.
House of Lannister
Aka, the scheming ones. Having seen off her husband via a hunting "accident", the malevolently-eyebrowed Queen Cersei (main, right) is now free to impose her will via her teenage son - she hopes. Her dwarf half-brother, flagrant scene-stealer Tyrion, looks set to get power, too, after he wangles a role as the King's chief counsel.
House of Targaryen
Aka, the slighted ones. Fledgling warrior Queen Daenerys Targaryen is set to invade Westeros to reclaim the Seven Kingdoms so rudely snatched away from her dad by Robert Baratheon. And you wouldn't bet against her, as she's got three newborn dragons and a platinumblonde coiffure on her side.
House of Stark
Aka, the noble ones. The Starks paid for their aberrant integrity with the beheading of King Robert's right-hand man and protagonist Ned Stark (Sean Bean) in the first series. Son Robb is out for vengeance, as he mobilises a rebellion.

Zelphalya
Voir le profil de Zelphalya   Cliquer ici pour écrire à Zelphalya  

le 11-04-2012
à 10:02

Si quelqu'un veut laisser des commentaires, voici la version en ligne : http://www.lepoint.fr/livres/fantasy-le-nouveau-tolkien-05-04-2012-1450122_37.php
Aglarond
Voir le profil de Aglarond   Cliquer ici pour écrire à Aglarond  

le 13-04-2012
à 21:41

Amis "lecteurs acnéiques", bonsoir ! :)
Mercredi, comme tout bédéphile qui se respecte, je me rue à ma librairie préférée pour acheter le dernier tome de l'excellentissime série De Cape et de Crocs (que ceux qui ne la connaissent pas se précipitent pour l'acheter), et j'en profite pour acheter les 3 derniers des 13 tomes de l'Assassin Royal de Robin Hobb lorsque le libraire, qui commence à me connaître, m'offre les Préludes au Trône de Fer... A-t-on jamais vu cadeau plus dangereux : c'est un coup à devoir acheter du GRR Martin au kilogramme dans les mois à venir !
Mais si vous me confirmez la médaille d'argent, il va falloir se laisser tenter...

A.

En bonus, la question du soir : ça ne vous rappelle rien ?
Les mimes !
La réponse par ici...

ALDARIL
Voir le profil de ALDARIL   Cliquer ici pour écrire à ALDARIL  

le 13-04-2012
à 22:33

Pour plus de précisions, concernant la saga du Trône de Fer et la médaille d'argent, que je lui décerne, au titre de lecteur insatiable et féru de vocabulaire ancien :

* qualité de la traduction vf, mettant en valeur notre belle langue française
* le rendu médiéval est parfait, tant dans les mots que dans l' intrigue, dialogues hauts en couleur.
* Au contraire de ce qui s'est fait dans le genre Héroic-Fantasy, il n' y a pas surabondance d'effets de style décrivant la magie ou des monstres.
* le fantastique est presque inexistant, l'auteur le distille très légèrement et finement.
* je qualifierais l'intrigue digne de l'oeuvre de Shakespeare , par son analyse des rapports humains, des intrigues de pouvoirs entre les familles aristocratiques magnifiquement décadentes, avides et déroutantes.
*l'atmosphère de la saga est pesante, dans le bon sens j'entends. Dès les premières lignes, vous êtes amenés dans un univers baroque, ténébreux et tragique. En comparaison, la Roue du Temps parait bien faiblarde et beaucoup trop longue, voir inégalement bien écrite par endroits.
* La série est fidèle au roman, et c'est elle qui m'a donné envie de lire l'oeuvre de G.RR.Martin. Pour le moment, je ne suis pas déçu.
* Je conseille un petit livre de Georges Martin, Le chevalier errant- suivi du chevalier lige-, l'histoire est digne de Chrétien de Troyes ou des mythes arthurien.
Cela fait une centaine de pages, vous pourrez vous rendre compte de sa qualité narrative, à moindre frais. En plus, l'histoire se déroule dans le monde décrit dans le Trône de Fer.
*il mérite la seconde place au panthéon des auteurs du genre, car il ne tombe pas dans le piège du pastiche du seigneur des anneaux ou d'un scénario de jeu de rôles style Donjons et Dragons... Cette saga du Trône de Fer, tient à la fois du roman historique ( je fais la comparaison avec les Rois Maudits de Maurice Druon) et de la Tragédie Grecque.
* En tant que lecteur, je redécouvre avec G RR Martin, le plaisir de lire une grande et originale saga. Je cesse là mon éloge. Peut-être, que d'autres ne seront pas aussi enthousiastes , donc au plaisir de lire votre commentaire.

Aglarond
Voir le profil de Aglarond   Cliquer ici pour écrire à Aglarond  

le 13-04-2012
à 23:02

Ce panégyrique me laisse pantois, pour paraphraser Armand Raynal de Maupertuis.
C'est justement le diptyque "Le chevalier errant - L'épée lige" que l'astucieux libraire m'a offert, cela fera une mise en bouche appréciable.
A.
lambertine
Voir le profil de lambertine   Cliquer ici pour écrire à lambertine  

le 15-04-2012
à 12:23

A Son of Ice and Fire (je déteste le titre français), c'est un mélange (sans être un plagiat) entre Tolkien, Shaekespeare, Druon, Emily Brontë ( voir le personnage de Littlefinger), Robin des Bois, la Guerre des Deux Roses, en plus triste, plus violent, plus pessimiste, plus érotique. Ames sensibles, accrochez-vous. GRR Martin a un sacré stock de sacs gris dans le tiroir de son bureau.
Laegalad
Voir le profil de Laegalad   Cliquer ici pour écrire à Laegalad  

le 15-04-2012
à 09:41

Oui, ben mon perso préféré étant déjà mort, je n'ai plus envie de lire la suite, moi ^^
Melilot
Voir le profil de Melilot   Cliquer ici pour écrire à Melilot  

le 15-04-2012
à 10:53

Pareil.
(à Lamberte : Quoi! Y'a Heathcliff dedans!? Arg)
Aglarond
Voir le profil de Aglarond   Cliquer ici pour écrire à Aglarond  

le 16-04-2012
à 20:57

Au fait, au-delà de la qualité de la traduction vantée par ALDARIL, est-ce péché que de ne pas lire cette multilogie (sic) en anglais ?
A.
ALDARIL
Voir le profil de ALDARIL   Cliquer ici pour écrire à ALDARIL  

le 17-04-2012
à 01:15

Allez-y, lisez le en Anglais, bon courage. Moi je le ferais quand je saurais lire l' anglais, sans penser en Français en même temps, ce qui gâche pour mon cas le plaisir de la lecture. Donc, merci aux traducteurs francophones de toutes les oeuvres anglaises; je ne désespère pas un jour, de pouvoir lire l' anglais sans buter sur les mots.
lambertine
Voir le profil de lambertine   Cliquer ici pour écrire à lambertine  

le 17-04-2012
à 14:52

Ben... un peu, Lilotte...

Imagine Isabelle (Lysa) épousant le Premier Ministre et le poussant à "pousser" la carrière du bohémien dont elle est amoureuse (jusqu'à en faire le ministre des Finances)... Imagine Cathy (Catelyn) duchesse et Edgar (Eddard) meilleur ami du Roi... Imagine ce gamin pauvre élevé dans une riche famille comme le fils de la maison et amoureux fou de sa "soeur" adoptive... et à qui on fait comprendre qu'il n'est pas digne de devenir le mari de cette soeur adoptive...

Et que je leur fais comprendre, à tous ces crétins de riches, que je vaux mieux qu'eux, et que je... C'est pas Heathcliff, ça ?

TB
Voir le profil de TB   Cliquer ici pour écrire à TB  

le 19-04-2012
à 04:34

Je l' ai toujours dit, ce qui manque dans Toto, c' est des gonzesses à poil sur des fourrures!
Ah, le Point...Ca promettait tellement, un titre pareil! Mais, penses-tu...Ca s' obstine, ça s' obstine!
Carpe diem
ISENGAR
Voir le profil de ISENGAR   Cliquer ici pour écrire à ISENGAR  

le 19-04-2012
à 09:00

Par contre des fourrures à poil sur des gonzesses, on doit pouvoir plus facilement en trouver :p

-- > sortie...

Yyr
Voir le profil de Yyr   Cliquer ici pour écrire à Yyr  

le 24-04-2012
à 19:11

Zelphalya a dit :
Si quelqu'un veut laisser des commentaires, voici la version en ligne : http://www.lepoint.fr/livres/fantasy-le-nouveau-tolkien-05-04-2012-1450122_37.php
Merci Zelph' :) C'est ce que je me suis permis ; j'ai intitulé mon commentaire : Carabistouille ... :) Quoique apparemment il n'est pas encore publié. Je n'ai pas le talent de TB (ni d'Isengar). C'est donc moins drôle :)

Je n'ai pas lu cette saga mais le prisme de ces critiques (du Point et de l'Independant) ne m'en donne pas envie. Vu d'ici, ce n'est pas sans me faire penser à l'opposition évasion/désertion i.e. recouvrement/compensation que j'évoquais par ici à la suite de l'interview d'Anne Besson & Vincent du 28/03/12. Au-delà de la qualité narrative, au-delà de la qualité des pierres si j'ose dire avec laquelle GRRR Martin a bâti sa tour, que permet-elle de contempler au loin ? C'est me semble-t-il une question au moins aussi importante que celle des motifs utilisés. Si du haut de cette tour il ne nous est donné de voir que « l'ambiguïté de notre époque », ben, comment dire ... :)

sosryko
Voir le profil de sosryko   Cliquer ici pour écrire à sosryko  

le 24-04-2012
à 21:23

Yyr : Si si, ton commentaire a été publié ;-)
ISENGAR
Voir le profil de ISENGAR   Cliquer ici pour écrire à ISENGAR  

le 25-04-2012
à 09:11

A propos, puisqu'on parle du point... un petit retour en arrière s'impose :)

- Une critique à chaud (21/12/2001) du film La Communauté de l'Anneau

- Une présentation carabistouilleuse - et du coup hilarante - (13/12/2002) du Tolkien fandom, comme on dirait aujourd'hui.

Héhé... bonne lecture, camarades :)

I.

Hyarion
Voir le profil de Hyarion   Cliquer ici pour écrire à Hyarion  

le 25-04-2012
à 16:23


Interview de George R.R. Martin pour SFFWorld, 2006 (propos recensés sur Tolkiendil) :
Q: « Honnêtement, croyez-vous que le genre « fantasy » va être reconnu comme étant de la vraie littérature ? A dire vrai, je pense qu'on n’a jamais eu autant de bons livres/séries que maintenant, et pourtant, il y a toujours très peu de respect (pour ne pas dire pas du tout) pour le genre. »

R: « Il y a toujours de la résistance, mais il me semble que J.R.R.Tolkien est enfin admis comme un canon littéraire, bien qu’à contre-cœur, et ça donne de l’espoir au reste d'entre nous. Enfin, seul le temps en décidera. Les bestsellers d’aujourd’hui seront-il toujours lus dans vingt ans ? Cinquante ans ? Cent ans ? »

Q: « : Les séries comme le Trône de Fer sont-elles quelque chose que vous avez toujours eu fortement envie d'écrire, ou est-ce quelque chose qui est venu plus tard dans votre carrière d’écrivain ? »

R: « J’ai toujours aimé la fantasy, depuis ma découverte de Robert E. Howard et de J.R.R. Tolkien au lycée. J’écrivais de l'heroic fantasy même dans ma période fanzine des années 60, au même titre que des histoires de science-fiction, d’horreur et de super-héros. En vérité, j’aime toutes les saveurs de la fiction fantastique, et passer d’un genre à un autre ne m’a jamais posé grand problème. »


Avoir lu dans sa jeunesse Robert E. Howard et J.R.R. Tolkien, et être conscient de la grande incertitude qui règne sur la postérité de la BCF (Big Commercial Fantasy) d'aujourd'hui : il y a plus médiocre comme positionnement en tant qu'écrivain de fantasy, non ? ;-)

Quand on n'est pas obsédé par le seul Tolkien depuis l'enfance, et que l'on n'a pas la prétention de faire quelque-chose dont on soit sûr que cela restera durablement dans les mémoires, je trouve que l'on adopte une attitude assez saine en tant qu'écrivain, dans le contexte éditorial actuel en matière de fantasy. Ceci dit, je n'irai pas, pour ma part, jusqu'à affirmer que Tolkien est un "canon littéraire" à lui tout seul : sauf erreur de ma part, être une référence littéraire, même majeure, ne veut pas dire être un canon ! ;-)

Invoquer Tolkien à toutes les sauces comme étant la seule source incontournable du genre, le seul horizon, forcément "indépassable", alors que l'oeuvre de Tolkien elle-même n'est ni parfaite, ni indépassable (au nom de quoi le serait-elle, d'ailleurs ?)... Tout cela, je l'avoue, me fatigue depuis longtemps, car en se laissant aller à ce type de discours facile, on perd de vue ce qui est réellement intéressant, à mon sens, aussi bien chez Tolkien que dans la fantasy dans son ensemble.
Si vouloir à tout prix couper Tolkien de sa postérité littéraire, sous prétexte de "légitimation" de l'écrivain, me laisse franchement perplexe, vouloir d'un autre côté imposer Tolkien comme la référence unique et absolue, en matière de critique littéraire du genre de la fantasy aujourd'hui, me parait tout autant dépourvu de sens.
L'invocation de Tolkien pour parler du Trône de Fer, à la limite pourquoi pas, dans la mesure où George R.R. Martin a lu Tolkien très tôt et en a sûrement été influencé d'une manière ou d'une autre... mais ce n'est sûrement pas la seule référence qu'il faudrait alors évoquer ! Le reste, comme d'habitude, n'est que du marketing journalistique, ce qui est fort peu surprenant de la part du Point : sur le fond, on est en tout cas bien loin de la très intéressante émission de France Culture à laquelle Yyr fait référence, concernant l'entretien avec Anne Besson et Vincent du 28 mars dernier...
Aux yeux de certains, Tolkien n'est-il donc devenu qu'une simple "marque", référence "commode" à exhiber systématiquement dès que l'on parle de fantasy, juste pour être sûr de faire un "bon papier" avec un titre qui "claque" bien ("Le nouveau Tolkien", tellement facile) même s'il est dépourvu de sens profond ? Tolkien doit-il être une sorte de fétiche obligé dès que l'on parle de la fantasy, d'une manière ou d'une autre ? C'est là bien mal connaître, me semble-t-il, la diversité du genre et de ses origines, ainsi que les spécificités des oeuvres originales des écrivains ayant eu une postérité dans le genre en question, comme Robert E. Howard et J.R.R. Tolkien, justement...

Je n'ai pas lu le Trône de Fer jusqu'ici, car les "sagas" de fantasy actuelles en 36 volumes ne m'ont jamais beaucoup attiré, en raison justement de leur longueur, qui ne m'effraie pas en soi, mais que je trouve généralement un peu excessive sur le principe. Mais bon, je vais peut-être me décider un jour à tenter l'expérience... Le chevalier errant a fait partie du recueil Légendes dirigé par Robert Silverberg, et paru en poche chez J'ai Lu il y a une dizaine d'années : cette nouvelle de Martin est une de celles que je n'avais pas lu, à l'époque... Le volume dort quelque-part dans un rayon de ma bibliothèque, et n'est donc pas perdu. ;-)

Quant à la "saga" du Trône de Fer elle-même, assez récemment éditée en intégrale sous forme de petits pavés en poche chez J'ai Lu, et dont j'ai entendu dire que beaucoup d'intrigues initiales trouvaient leurs conclusions au terme du troisième volume de cette intégrale (est-ce exact ?), je ne peux donc pas en parler, n'en ayant pas lu plus de quelques lignes distraitement... Même chose pour la série télé de chez HBO adaptant les livres de G.R.R. Martin : un soir, il y a quelques mois, dans un train Paris-Toulouse, j'ai aperçu quelques images de cette série, que regardait un autre voyageur, assis de dos dans le rang de sièges devant moi, avec son ordinateur portable... Je n'ai vu qu'une scène de sexe, assez courte, suivie d'une assez longue séquence de dialogues (muette forcément pour moi) entre un homme et une femme dans un décor médiéval : l'accroche n'était certes pas désagréable, mais cela ne m'a donné sans doute qu'une petite idée ! ;-)

Mais de tout cela, je sais que le Dragon et sa fée pourraient en parler bien mieux que moi : sauf erreur de ma part, ils aiment beaucoup le Trône de Fer, sur papier comme sur écran... ;-) ...au point qu'il est décidément bien étrange qu'ils ne soient pas encore venu ici pour donner leur avis éclairé !

Du reste, merci à Isengar pour ses liens vers d'anciens articles du Point (dont les couvertures, souvent quelque peu lourdingues, sont décidément à l'image d'au moins une partie du contenu de ses numéros, pour ce que l'on peut en voir), et tout particulièrement pour le lien vers cette "présentation carabistouilleuse" (c'est le moins que l'on puisse dire !) de la planète des Tolkiendili : aux yeux de certains journalistes à court de copie, il était alors assez facile de passer pour des illuminés ! En tout cas, même si certaines informations sont évidemment datées, on peut dire que dix ans après, cette brillante "synthèse" est aussi hilarante que si elle avait été écrite cette année ! ;-))
L'article original, datant du 13 décembre 2002 (à 12:37), est censé avoir été modifié le 19 janvier 2007 (toujours à 12:37) : on se demande quelle est l'étendue de la (ou des) modification(s)... ;-))

A titre personnel, j'adore ce paragraphe :

En des temps obscurs, un journaliste anonyme du "Point" a écrit :
En attendant, une quarantaine de sites Internet proposent des initiations aux langues tolkieniennes, avec des extraits audio pour apprendre la prononciation. Didier Willis, un ingénieur informaticien qui parle couramment le sindarin, a ainsi mis en ligne gratuitement un dictionnaire sindarin/anglais, qu'il s'apprête à doter d'une version française. Mais l'engouement grandissant pour les langues elfiques agace parfois les puristes. « Les discussions qui tournaient autour de problèmes grammaticaux sont monopolisées par des moins de 20 ans qui veulent connaître leur nom en elfique, ou apprendre la langue très vite façon méthode Assimil, regrette Edouard Kloczko. J'attends avec impatience que l'on puisse de nouveau discuter de sujets sérieux. »

Par Crom, il est génial, ce papier... ;-))

Amicalement,

Hyarion.

ISENGAR
Voir le profil de ISENGAR   Cliquer ici pour écrire à ISENGAR  

le 25-04-2012
à 17:07

>> sauf erreur de ma part, être une référence littéraire, même majeure, ne veut pas dire être un canon !

Je suis persuadé que Jane Austen était une très belle femme :)
Quant à Beaumarchais, nul doute qu'il passerait très bien auprès des dames, de nos jours ;p

I.

Yyr
Voir le profil de Yyr   Cliquer ici pour écrire à Yyr  

le 25-04-2012
à 21:41

Aglarond a dit :
Au fait, au-delà de la qualité de la traduction vantée par ALDARIL, est-ce péché que de ne pas lire cette multilogie (sic) en anglais ?
Je viens d'avoir un de mes amis au téléphone : il se met à cette lecture, et il s'était justement posé cette question avant de commencer. L'ensemble des critiques qu'il a trouvées considèrent que la traduction française est mauvaise. Il s'y est donc mis en anglais et ne regrette pas : le vocabulaire et le style sont simples, m'a-t-il dit ...

Yyr
Voir le profil de Yyr   Cliquer ici pour écrire à Yyr  

le 25-04-2012
à 21:43


Ah ... je relis le message d'Aldaril. Les critiques de la traduction ne sont pas unanimes, donc.

ALDARIL
Voir le profil de ALDARIL   Cliquer ici pour écrire à ALDARIL  

le 26-04-2012
à 12:02

Je suis outré de l' argument selon lequel, ' la traduction française serait mauvaise'. Malpeste ! J'ai retrouvé dans la saga de George RRR Martin, la verve et le style ampoulé de la Reine Margot d' Alexandre Dumas ; le livre est truffé de mots peu usités et de tournures de phrases, que nous n'usons plus de nos jours ( j'en ferais la liste ultérieurement). Et je dois dire aux Zoiles, qu'il faut lire avant d' émettre un jugement; pour moi lire, c'est à la fois se laisser emporter par une histoire, et découvrir de nouveaux mots ( eh oui, il ne faut pas être prétentieux, qui peut dire connaitre tous les mots de langue française, personne ! beaucoup de mots anciens, de termes techniques,et de verbes sont en désuétude ( jeter un oeil au fameux Bescherelle, beaucoup de verbes sont inconnus de 98% de la population, on n'étudie même pas leur sens à l' école ) ( du nom de Zoile, un critique littéraire qui se caractérisait dit-on par sa mauvaise foi et sa malveillance , son nom est synonyme de Mauvais Critique ; à l'inverse, un Aristarque, est lui un bon critique littéraire, qui met à la fois en perspective les qualités et les défauts d'une oeuvre; )
* autre point, moi depuis mon plus jeune âge, depuis que je lis, je regarde le dictionnaire et je prends note des nouveaux mots, des expressions, ( ça fait très maitre Capello, je sais..)
* Qui peut dire sans prétention, comprendre parfaitement le texte de la Reine Margot ? Personne ! ,On est obligé pour ce bouquin et bien d'autres oeuvres, de se renseigner dans un dico et de connaitre le sens des mots. Si on ne fait pas cette technique de chercheur de mots, franchement on passe à côté de la richesse d'un texte et de la compréhension même du récit. Et cela vaut pour Tolkien ( j'ai appris le sens du mot 'sagace' quand je l'ai lu à 11 ans, par exemple), comme pour George RR Martin, Dumas, Zola, Druon, Jules Vernes, Boris Vian, Claude Seignolle.....

Donc, après ce long soliloque de passionné de lecture et du Français, je dis aux gens de se faire leur opinion en lisant les livres, avec méthode ! Il y a plein de gens qui par exemple n'ont que mépris pour les écrits Tolkien, sans l' avoir lu véritablement, alors attention à ne pas tomber dans ce travers- là !

ALDARIL
Voir le profil de ALDARIL   Cliquer ici pour écrire à ALDARIL  

le 26-04-2012
à 12:11

Un grand merci aux traducteurs français!

* lire dans la langue originale , c'est toujours un bon point, mais il faut reconnaitre la supériorité du Français sur l' Anglais, qui n'est qu'un avatar déformé de notre langue, du latin, du celte, du normand, et du saxon.
* Oui, je suis un horrible fanatique du Français ! Mea Culpa !

ALDARIL
Voir le profil de ALDARIL   Cliquer ici pour écrire à ALDARIL  

le 26-04-2012
à 12:20

* le Français est lui même , je le reconnais, une langue composite, issue du Latin, du Celte, du franc..., mais bon c'est là la richesse de toutes les langues du Monde, une fusion entre plusieurs dialectes. Toutes les langues ont leur beauté propre , même l' anglais ( pour moi, c'est la langue musicale par excellence de l' occident).
ALDARIL
Voir le profil de ALDARIL   Cliquer ici pour écrire à ALDARIL  

le 26-04-2012
à 12:32

J'oubliais, je suis d'accord avec le commentaire de YYIR laissé sur le site du Point. Je n'aime pas cette étiquette ' comme Tolkien', je la trouve réductrice, méprisante et fourre-tout !
Yyr
Voir le profil de Yyr   Cliquer ici pour écrire à Yyr  

le 26-04-2012
à 09:09

Aldaril a dit :
J'ai retrouvé dans la saga de George RRR Martin, la verve et le style ampoulé de la Reine Margot d' Alexandre Dumas ; le livre est truffé de mots peu usités et de tournures de phrases, que nous n'usons plus de nos jours
Justement, c'était là l'une des critiques les plus importantes apparemment : la traduction française aurait exagéré cet aspect au point de rendre la lecture française moins fluide qu'en v.o. Mais bon, je n'ai pas fait la recension des critiques moi-même. Ceux qui liront dans les deux langues nous en diront plus ...

En tout cas ta passion pour le français fait plaisir à voir, Aldaril :)

ISENGAR
Voir le profil de ISENGAR   Cliquer ici pour écrire à ISENGAR  

le 26-04-2012
à 09:55

Maistre Yyr :
En tout cas ta passion pour le français fait plaisir à voir, Aldaril :)

Tout à fait d'accord :)
Cependant...

Padawan Aldaril :

mais il faut reconnaitre la supériorité du Français sur l' Anglais, qui n'est qu'un avatar déformé de notre langue, du latin, du celte, du normand, et du saxon
...

le Français est lui même , je le reconnais, une langue composite, issue du Latin, du Celte, du franc..., mais bon c'est là la richesse de toutes les langues du Monde, une fusion entre plusieurs dialectes
...

même l' anglais ( pour moi, c'est la langue musicale par excellence de l' occident)


(tousse)...

Sans vouloir jouer le Zoïle (on m'a souvent dit par le passé que je le faisais très bien) pas plus que le zouave, je dois bien signaler que le bel entrain échevelé avec lequel tu entreprends de défendre les traductions en français de Martin te conduisent vers les travers de quelques très légères contradictions.
Ce sont des choses qui arrivent quand on démarre la locomotive sans vérifier les freins :)

A côté de ça, je ne suis pas d'accord avec la première citation que j'ai pris le soin de mettre en exergue.
Non, le français n'est pas "supérieur" à l'anglais. Ce sont deux langues aux origines et aux histoires différentes, avec des périodes de convergences fortes (XI-XIIè siècles du français vers l'anglais et XX-XXIè siècles de l'anglais vers le français). L'une a sans doute un vocabulaire plus varié et une grammaire plus complexe, tandis que l'autre a une variété d'accentuation très riche. Mais ni l'une, ni l'autre ne sont "supérieures".

Après, quelques petits points de pinaillage :
Tu évoques le "saxon" comme une langue à l'origine de "l'avatar déformé" qu'est l'anglais. c'est un peu court autant que c'est inexact, car l'anglais est issu principalement d'un agglomérat de langues anglo-saxonnes, parlées par les migrants angles, saxons et jutes, venus s'installer en Angleterre entre le IVème et le VIè siècles. Tu oublies par ailleurs la très grande importance de l'apport de la langue des Vikings, le vieux norrois, dans la construction de ce qui sera l'anglais médiéval, avant de devenir le moyen anglais puis l'anglais.
A contrario, le "celte" n'a eu qu'une faible influence. d'ailleurs le "celte" de l'anglais, c'est le brittonique, qui n'est pas la même chose que le "celte" du français, qui est le gaulois, encore que selon les régions, on ne parlait sans doute pas forcément le même gaulois - on devrait donc dire "langues gauloises". et puis pour le français, il ne faut pas oublier le grec, le norrois, l'arabe... et puis aussi distinguer les substrats des superstrats... et quid de l'influence des langues et patois locaux ?...
Aah, camarade Aldaril, tout n'est pas si simple :)

I. un gars, Zoïle...

Silmo
Voir le profil de Silmo   Cliquer ici pour écrire à Silmo  

le 26-04-2012
à 11:35


"c'est un germain breton, mais il ne faut pas le secouer trop fort, même s'il le demande"

Silmo :-)
quant au zouave, il m'a furieusement fait penser à Tournesol dasn Objectif Lune :-D

Aglarond
Voir le profil de Aglarond   Cliquer ici pour écrire à Aglarond  

le 27-04-2012
à 19:42

Tournesol, un zouave ? ;)

A.

Laegalad
Voir le profil de Laegalad   Cliquer ici pour écrire à Laegalad  

le 27-04-2012
à 22:15

Juste pour le Zouave, et Tournesol... merci \o/
Elendil Voronda
Voir le profil de Elendil Voronda  

le 28-04-2012
à 09:35

J'ai lu les deux premiers tomes du Trône de Fer en français. J'ai trouvé que l'intrigue était très bonne, et me suis arrêté, d'abord parce que le personnage auquel je m'étais le plus attaché s'est fait assassiné bêtement, ensuite parce que le texte était suffisamment abouti pour que j'ai envie de le lire en anglais (mais comme je n'ai pas encore passé commande, j'en suis resté là).

Je n'ai pas trouvé que la traduction française soit particulièrement lourde. Mais bon, il y a de cela vingt ans et plus, je n'avais pas trouvé non plus que la traduction du SdA soit particulièrement exigeante sur le plan du vocabulaire. Il avait fallu attendre que je me mette à l'anglais pour me rendre compte qu'en effet, le texte de Tolkien n'était pas dépourvu d'une certaine complexité.

shudhakalyan
Voir le profil de shudhakalyan   Cliquer ici pour écrire à shudhakalyan  

le 30-09-2012
à 16:25

Je viens de lire ce passionnant fuseau avec un immense plaisir. Ah, Jrrvf, quand même, tu es unique !

J'ai commencé, il y a peu, A Song of Ice and Fire en anglais, dont Lambertine rappelle avec raison le titre original, après avoir regardé les deux saisons de la série télévisée correspondante, A Game of Thrones.


Ce titre me permet d'évoquer deux points, parmi tout ce que j'aurais envie de dire (et tout ce à quoi j'aurais envie d'applaudir), mais vu ma longueur habituelle, ce sera déjà beaucoup : la traduction et le rapport à Tolkien.

Le premier tome de A Song of Ice and Fire s'appelle A Game of Thrones, repris comme titre de toute la série télévisée, et traduit, en français, par Le Trône de Fer pour la série télévisée comme pour la saga littéraire.

Ce changement de titre, déjà présent en anglais entre les livres et les films, me parait très lourd de conséquences. Même si l'intrigue sociopolitique semble au cœur du récit, et surtout semble constituer la colonne vertébrale ou le squelette qui permettent d'articuler entre elles les intrigues les plus variées, le changement de titre réduit l'ensemble de l'histoire aux jeux de pouvoir. Dans cette mesure, on peut même se demander pourquoi, s'il en est ainsi, est-ce aussi une série de Fantasy, et pourquoi pas simplement un ensemble de romans historiques sur le Moyen-Âge, comme ceux de Walter Scott ou ceux, auxquels j'ai aussi pensé en voyant la série (comme Aldaril), de Maurice Druon avec Les rois maudits ? En revanche, le titre original insiste sur l'idée, d'emblée, qu'il y a quelque chose de plus à voir ("more than meets the eye", comme dit souvent Tolkien) dans ce récit de Fantasy que les jeux de pouvoir. À la limite, la violence est mise en avant pour elle-même ("Ice and Fire"). Elle pourrait paraitre quelque chose de moins important que les jeux politiques, mais, en réalité, elle concerne le rapport à la mort, et aussi, dans le titre, une dimension légendaire de confrontation entre des forces primales (la glace et le feu), la lutte de l'homme contre la nature ou des puissances qui le dépassent, etc. C'est tout l'intérêt de l'adage des Starks. Il y a beaucoup de devises dans le texte, pour chacune des 7 grandes familles qui se disputent le trône des 7 royaumes. J'ai lu quelque part que celle des Starks, qui est aussi la première qu'on entend et celle qui revient le plus souvent, et qui résume peut-être l'élément le plus décisif d'un suspense spécifique à la Fantasy, se différencie complètement des autres parce qu'elle ne parle pas d'honneur et de gloire ; cette devise, c'est : "Winter is coming." "L'hiver arrive."

J'aime beaucoup, même si je n'ai pas lu les autres discussions auxquelles il renvoie, la question que soulève Yyr (que j'applaudis aussi pour son commentaire sur l'article du Point) :


Yyr a dit :
au-delà de la qualité des pierres si j'ose dire avec lesquelles GRRR Martin (sic) a bâti sa tour, que permet-elle de contempler au loin ?


À mon avis, en tout cas, plus que le jeu des rapports politiques. C'est l'intérêt de ce qui se passe aux bordures du royaume : de l'autre côté du mur, au nord, avec une menace surnaturelle très ancienne ("Les autres", "Les marcheurs blancs", pour "Ice") et au sud, avec le retour inattendu des Dragons (pour "Fire").

Or la traduction du titre en français fait perdre toute cette dimension. La glace (les marcheurs du Nord) et le Feu (les dragons du Sud) se réduisent au fer (les jeux de pouvoir autour du trône). Je renvoie aussi à la très belle analyse du "song" chez Tolkien qu'avait fait Marguerite Mouton à Cerisy, et qui fait également écho à l'emploi du même terme dans le titre anglais, qu'on aurait simplement pu traduire par "Un chant de glace et de feu".

Bien sûr, le titre est un cas très particulier. Mais ça montre un point qui me semble devoir être rappelé.

Il me parait aussi absurde de penser qu'il est obligatoire de lire une œuvre dans sa langue originale que de penser, à de rares exceptions près, qu'il vaut mieux la lire en français qu'en anglais.

Si on lit une œuvre traduite, et c'est évidemment la première dimension du problème avant de savoir les langues qui sont impliquées à la source ou comme cible, c'est d'abord me semble-t-il par défaut, faute de mieux, parce qu'on sait qu'on ne pourra pas entrer dans le texte original comme on pourra entrer dans la traduction. En ce sens, vive les traducteurs, effectivement, et vive les œuvres traduites, comme le souligne Aldaril !


Cependant, sauf à mépriser l'œuvre originale, comme cela arrive en réalité souvent, ou la langue originale, comme Aldaril tend à s'y laisser entrainer, la traduction est toujours un second choix par rapport à l'œuvre originale pour quelqu'un qui aurait effectivement le choix.

Pour moi, il ne pourrait pas y avoir pire traduction que celle qui prétendrait être meilleure ou même valoir l'œuvre originale qu'elle traduit, sauf à considérer que cette œuvre originale est elle-même médiocre et de faible intérêt. Et je ne crois pas, contrairement aux propos révoltants de l'article qu'a cité Jean d'un critique qui semble se croire en faveur de Tolkien, qu'on puisse dissocier l'intérêt d'une œuvre littéraire du travail de son écriture.

Le type qui confie sa passion pour Le SdA qu'il a lu 5 fois dit, sans broncher, dans The Independent :
Yes, it is badly written.

Et l'on voudrait nous faire croire, dans Le Point, que Tolkien est reconnu comme un canon littéraire ? Tant qu'on parle de son récit comme si l'écriture ou le style y étaient étrangers, il n'y a aucune chance pour que ça arrive...

Par ailleurs, il est possible qu'une traduction (ou une adaptation cinématographique...), qui a pour vocation de se mettre au service de l'œuvre traduite, ait ses propres mérites et certaines qualités originales.

Aldaril évoque l'épaisseur archaïque du français, même s'il ne la nomme pas comme ça, et, de ce point de vue, il y a un génie propre au français qui est incomparable avec l'anglais. De ce point de vue, même Le Seigneur des Anneaux me parait tout autrement chargé historiquement que The Lord of the Rings ou, pis encore, en allemand, Die Herr von der Ringen.

Cependant, une grande œuvre littéraire utilise au maximum les ressources linguistiques de la langue dans laquelle elle est écrite. De ce point de vue, non seulement l'anglais n'est pas inférieur au français, ce qui est une affirmation absurde, mais, en outre, un travail réalisé en anglais exploite des potentialités qu'une langue de traduction, de réception ne peut pas égaler, même si cette langue ajoute d'autres attraits qui ne sont pas dans l'œuvre originale.

Isengar défend à juste titre l'égalité de principe entre le français et l'anglais, mais il le fait par endroits de façon maladroite qui semble desservir l'anglais plus que le défendre... (je me demande parfois si votre problème, à vous, n'est pas parfois d'être précisément des Français :D...)

Isengar a dit :
Non, le français n'est pas "supérieur" à l'anglais. Ce sont deux langues aux origines et aux histoires différentes, avec des périodes de convergences fortes (XI-XIIè siècles du français vers l'anglais et XX-XXIè siècles de l'anglais vers le français). L'une a sans doute un vocabulaire plus varié et une grammaire plus complexe, tandis que l'autre a une variété d'accentuation très riche. Mais ni l'une, ni l'autre ne sont "supérieures".

Je suis vraiment sceptique sur le fait que le français puisse avoir un vocabulaire plus varié et une grammaire plus complexe que l'anglais, et si l'anglais n'a que l'accentuation à opposer à cela, j'en conclurais volontiers, du moins sur le plan littéraire, que le français est supérieur à l'anglais.

J'ai pas mal travaillé sur la traduction du SdA pour mon plaisir personnel (et avec une connaissance très moyenne de l'anglais, mais suffisamment bonne du français...). Parvenir à rendre, en traduction, l'incroyable synonymie des verbes et des substantifs utilisés en anglais par Tolkien pour décrire différentes variantes de luminosité est un véritable casse-tête (notamment dans La Vieille Forêt, Chapitre 6 du Livre I si je me souviens bie). Voilà pour l'exemple de la variété du vocabulaire. Pour la grammaire, je vous renvoie à n'importe quelle entrée de dictionnaire à partir d'un verbe courant + préposition... "get of", "get off", "get up", "get over", "get under", etc. La forme verbale et l'adjonction d'une préposition avec le régime que sous-tend le groupe ainsi formé, c'est une alchimie de sémantique et de syntaxe qui est redoutable. Voilà pour la complexité de la grammaire. Dans ces deux exemples, c'est le français qui parait simple en comparaison. Mais il est évident qu'on pourrait trouver autant d'exemples inverses.

Je pense qu'il y a, comme le suggère Isengar, effectivement des domaines où chacune de ces langues excelle, qui font leur génie propre et qui les rendent à la fois égales et incommensurables. L'accentuation est un exemple pour l'anglais. Mais le vocabulaire et la grammaire sont des domaines trop massifs. J'ai donné des exemples. Pour le français, je reviens à l'épaisseur historique rigidifiée dans un mot. La version sous-titrée du film du SdA est très révélatrice de ce point de vue. "I care not" ne vaut certainement pas, pour rendre la couche médiévale sensible, "Je n'en ai cure", comme disent les sous-titres français. En revanche, pour retrouver la solennité, l'intensité ET la simplicité d'un poème de Tolkien (comme le poème des Anneaux ou l'énigme de Grand-Pas "All that is gold does not glitter"...), on peut toujours se lever tôt...

Enfin, savoir si une traduction est bonne ou mauvaise, comme ça se sent dans les avis rapportés par Aldaril et Yyr, est toujours une question double : il y a la qualité de la traduction pour elle-même puis la question de la fidélité au texte. Je comprends ce qu'Aldaril apprécie dans la traduction du Trône de fer que je n'ai pas lue. Mais il me parait clair que le "style ampoulé" et le vocabulaire rare ne correspondent pas au style de G.R.R. Martin, pas plus qu'à celui de J.R.R. Tolkien, en tout cas comme caractéristiques régulières de leur style.

J'avais commencé en français Le vieil homme et la mer, avant de le lire en anglais. La traduction Gallimard que j'avais entamée mettait en scène un dialogue entre le jeune garçon et le vieux pêcheur du début du récit dans un style très argotique qui m'évoquait de nombreux textes américains du début du 20e. Quelle surprise quand j'ai découvert que le style d'Hemingway dans ce petit ouvrage était plus proche du Petit prince que du Voyage au bout de la nuit... Je dois même reconnaitre que la simplicité du style de ce petit ouvrage en anglais (qui a été l'occasion du Nobel pour Hemingway) m'a d'abord déconcerté et même déplu. Il n'empêche qu'une traduction comme celle du français dénote pour moi un profond mépris, même inconscient, du choix de l'auteur. Progressivement, je suis entré dans le récit en anglais d'Hemingway et j'ai compris tout l'intérêt de l'esthétique qu'il avait choisie.

Or Tolkien était très attentif à ce mépris que pouvait manifester les traducteurs ou les adaptateurs de son œuvre par rapport à ses choix d'auteurs, tout comme il était très sensible à la "simplicité solennelle" qui faisait à ces yeux le génie de l'anglais, malheureusement en grande partie gâté par l'héritage français... Encore adolescent, en fin de lycée, au King Edward's School de Birmingham, il avait fait une conférence consacrée à l'"invasion normande de polysyllabiques", si je puis dire, dans la langue anglaise ! :D

Il y a des traductions meilleures que d'autres, à la fois pour la valeur propre de la traduction et pour la fidélité au texte original. On peut se foutre totalement du problème de la traduction et de la langue originale et ne se soucier que du plaisir qu'on prend à lire une histoire dans la langue qu'on maitrise suffisamment pour cela. Je le conçois bien, mais, dans ce cas, il n'y a pas lieu d'en discuter. En revanche, si l'on se pose la question, je pense qu'il est important à la fois de lire à sa guise dans sa langue, tout en étant vigilant et conscient des conséquences qu'implique une traduction, même si l'on fait ce travail plus réflexif, plus critique, avant ou après la lecture et pas pendant, histoire de ne pas gâcher son plaisir...

J'ai appris à lire en anglais en lisant Tolkien. Au début, c'était extrêmement lent et pénible. À présent, je peux lire G.R.R. Martin avec fluidité, sans que cela ne gâche mon plaisir. Je trouve que l'effort en valait la peine, mais ce qui me frappe le plus, c'est surtout la prise de conscience que ça a entrainé pour moi. Désormais, quand je lis deux textes différents de Kafka, je peux avoir l'impression que l'un d'eux me semble très bien traduit (Le Journal de Kafka, par Marthe Robert), et l'autre non (Le Procès, par je ne sais plus qui). Je ne sais pas si ces impressions sont justes, puisque je ne parle pas l'allemand et je n'ai pas vérifié l'œuvre originale, mais elles sont la trace d'une vigilance à la question de la traduction.

*

Argh, je ne peux être que long, c'est terrible... :(

*

Pour le rapport à Tolkien qu'Hyarion évoquait très bien de façon critique, je suis parfaitement d'accord (1) avec le fait que G.R.R. Martin se situe de façon saine par rapport à Tolkien et (2) avec la lassitude par rapport au marketing de l'étiquette Tolkien qui prévaut dans la Fantasy.

Je suis d'ailleurs perplexe, ne lisant à peu près jamais de Fantasy en dehors de JRRT (GoT est donc une heureuse exception qui tend à changer mes pratiques), par rapport au fait qu'on a entendu de ce point de vue deux sons de cloches assez différents à Cerisy. Selon Alain Névant de Bragelonne, c'est souvent du marketing, et il y a peu de grands auteurs de fantasy qui sont vraiment dans l'héritage de Tolkien et, selon Anne Besson (pour reprendre une citation faite dans un mémoire récent) :


Tolkien n’a pas inventé la fantasy, dont on trouve bien d’autres exemples, et d’autres avatars avant lui – et pourtant le genre ne vaudrait sans doute simplement pas que l’on s’y arrête si Tolkien ne l’avait réinventé.
La Fantasy, Paris, Klincksieck, 2007, p. 62 (Coll. 50 questions)


Bref, personnellement, je ne sais pas trop ce qu'il faut en penser.

Toujours est-il qu'en ce qui concerne la saga de G.R.R. Martin, qui parait tout de même avoir la cote, les choses me paraissent suffisamment claires. D'un côté, on ne se trouve pas face à un simple imitateur de Tolkien et la saga a beaucoup d'aspects qui ne doivent rien au SdA. De l'autre, c'est une saga qui est manifestement dans l'héritage de Tolkien, à la fois sur des aspects fort visibles et omniprésents (le naturalisme du merveilleux, le rapport à un passé légendaire et oublié), que sur des aspects plus circonscrits mais caractéristiques (l'usage des devises qui rappelle le style des "proverbes" chez Tolkien, les blasons), en passant par une esthétique moins facilement perceptible mais plus profonde. Ainsi A Song of Ice and Fire, pour revenir en "cycle" à mon début, est un titre qui me semble d'inspiration profondément tolkienienne, contrairement à Game of Thrones ou au Trône de Fer. De la même façon, on retrouve quelque chose, mais de façon beaucoup moins intense et dans une esthétique beaucoup moins aboutie, dans Le chant de glace et de feu, de ce que disait Tolkien du Seigneur des Anneaux :


I do not think that even Power or Domination is the real centre of my story. It provides the theme of a War, about something dark and threatening enough to seem at that time of supreme importance, but that is mainly 'a setting' for characters to show themselves. The real theme for me is about something much more permanent and difficult: Death and Immortality: the mystery of the love of the world in the hearts of a race 'doomed' to leave and seemingly lose it; the anguish in the hearts of a race 'doomed' not to leave it, until its whole evil-aroused story is complete.

Je ne pense pas que le Pouvoir ou la Domination puissent vraiment être le centre de mon histoire. Ils fournissent le thème d'une Guerre, concernant quelque chose de suffisamment sombre et menaçant pour sembler à cette époque d'une extrême importance, mais c'est principalement "un cadre" pour que les personnages se révèlent eux-mêmes. Le véritable thème est pour moi lié à quelque chose de beaucoup plus permanent et difficile : la Mort et l'Immortalité : le mystère de l'amour du monde dans les cœurs d'une race "destinée" à le quitter ; l'angoisse dans les cœurs d'une race "destinée" à ne pas le quitter, jusqu'à ce que soit accomplie leur propre histoire déclenchée par le mal.


The Letters, n°186, 1956

lambertine
Voir le profil de lambertine   Cliquer ici pour écrire à lambertine  

le 02-10-2012
à 14:57

Waouw...

Je ne parlerai ni de langues, ni de linguistique.

Je reviendrai seulement sur le titre de la saga. Sur le "A Song of Ice and Fire". Le Chant de la Glace et du Feu. Chant, non pas au sens de "chansonnettes" (même si les chansonnettes, les bluettes qui font tant rêver Sansa Stark, "princesse de contes de fées" au sens strict, jusque dans le malheur (belle, naïve, orpheline, malheureuse, rêveuse, aimée par un "monstre" physique et par un "monstre" psychologique) y ont leur place), mais au sens de "chanson de Geste", de "chanson venue de la nuit des temps", avec ses horreurs, ses amours, ses Dieux et ses rêves. Avec sa magie. Avec ses héritiers (dont les Stark, qui remontent aux "premiers hommes", et dont l'histoire se déroule au fil des Brandon successifs, de la Longue Nuit et la construction du Mur, en passant par trahisons, conquêtes, victoires et défaites, jusqu'à la rebellion de Ned et la "Guerre des 5 Rois", celle qui a pour enjeu ce fameux Trône de Fer. Les Stark, adorateurs des Anciens Dieux et proches des "Enfants de la Forêt", dont l'histoire légendaire et monstrueusement ancienne pourrait renvoyer à celle des ancêtres d'Aragorn).

J'ai dit que je n'aimais pas le titre "Le Trône de Fer", parce qu'il limite l'Histoire (des 7 Royaumes de Westeros) à son "présent", alors que ce "présent" n'est que la conclusion (provisoire) d'une histoire récente, et ancienne, et très ancienne... D'une guerre des Hommes et des Dieux, entre des forces qui dépassent les hommes et les dieux. Entre la Glace et le Feu ? Je ne sais pas. Je ne crois pas. Je ne crois pas que ce soit par hasard que j'ai fait un lapsus dans mon premier commentaire en écrivant "Son" à la place de "song" of ice and fire.

shudhakalyan
Voir le profil de shudhakalyan   Cliquer ici pour écrire à shudhakalyan  

le 02-10-2012
à 16:49

Je note d'ailleurs, puisque j'ai moi-même fait l'erreur, que c'est "Un chant" plutôt que "Le chant"... Mais je préfère "song" à "son", même si j'aime beaucoup tout ce que tu en dis Lambertine. Et je trouve que, pour le coup, tes remarques vont tout à fait dans le sens de l'analyse linguistique du terme "song" chez Tolkien par Marguerite... Parce qu'en effet ce n'est pas rien. Comme c'est important que ce soit de glace et de feu, et non entre, il est vrai. C'est aussi, bien entendu, une façon de dire que toute l'œuvre est un chant de glace et de feu, un chant marqué par la lutte des extrêmes et par l'intensité. Là aussi, l'œuvre de Tolkien est emplie de "chants" mais elle est aussi un chant, comme une plainte lointaine, ancienne et belle, tendue vers le ciel dans l'immensité...

Bref, tu me donnes encore davantage envie de lire cette saga, puisque pour ma part je n'en suis qu'au tout début de l'œuvre (outre les deux saisons de la série télévisée).

lambertine
Voir le profil de lambertine   Cliquer ici pour écrire à lambertine  

le 02-10-2012
à 19:59

Un chant de glace et de feu, oui, pardon.

Et "song" est, bien sûr, le mot origine/al, par rapport à "son".

Et pourtant... "son" a, je crois, sa place, dans ce chant. Un fils de glace et de feu. Pourquoi autant de lecteurs (dont moi, je l'avoue)voient-ils Jon comme un bâtard Stark-Targaryen ? Sinon parce que ce chant est né de cet affrontement-communion de ce qui paraît tellement antagoniste qu'il ne peut être qu'ennemis. La Glace et le Feu.
Le(s 7) Royaume(s) de Westeros, les Royaumes Humains ayant à affronter la Mort des Marcheurs Blancs, mais aussi, d'autres morts, ne sont-ils pas les fil, et de la Glace, et du Feu ?

shudhakalyan
Voir le profil de shudhakalyan   Cliquer ici pour écrire à shudhakalyan  

le 03-10-2012
à 02:41

Quand j'entends "fils", je crains toujours la résonance psychanalytique qui n'est jamais loin et par rapport à laquelle je suis très sceptique... mais là, tu en parles tellement bien que j'apprécie aussi ce jeu de mots entre "song" et "son"... quitte à en imaginer un plus francophone où se tissent les fils de glace et de feu ^^.
shudhakalyan
Voir le profil de shudhakalyan   Cliquer ici pour écrire à shudhakalyan  

le 03-10-2012
à 14:04

Shudhakalyan a dit :
C'est tout l'intérêt de l'adage des Starks. Il y a beaucoup de devises dans le texte, pour chacune des 7 grandes familles qui se disputent le trône des 7 royaumes. J'ai lu quelque part que celle des Starks, qui est aussi la première qu'on entend et celle qui revient le plus souvent, et qui résume peut-être l'élément le plus décisif d'un suspense spécifique à la Fantasy, se différencie complètement des autres parce qu'elle ne parle pas d'honneur et de gloire ; cette devise, c'est : "Winter is coming." "L'hiver arrive."

Ah, ce Shudhy, il est parfois un peu confus.

Juste pour préciser que ce "j'ai lu quelque part" renvoie en fait directement au roman lui-même :

Every noble house had its words. Family mottoes, touchstones, prayers of sorts, they boasted of honor and glory, promised loyalty and truth, swore faith and courage. All but the Starks. Winter is coming, said the Stark words.

Chaque maison noble avait son expression. Devises familiales, pierres de touche, sortes de prières, elles louaient l'honneur et la gloire, la loyauté promise et la vérité, la foi jurée et le courage. Toutes sauf les Stark. L'hiver arrive, disait l'expression des Stark.


A Game of Thrones, G. R. R. Martin, Ch. 2 "Catelyn", p. 21


Et voilà ^^.


Yyr
Voir le profil de Yyr   Cliquer ici pour écrire à Yyr  

le 09-10-2012
à 21:45


Merci shudhakalyan (et Lambertine), pour toutes ces reflexions qui m'intéressent beaucoup.

Un exemple à relever sur la question du vocabulaire des langues, et de ce qui est propre à chaque idiome : l'anglais a une belle variété d'adjectifs pour dire les tonalités de la lumière ; le français de son côté pour dire la richesse des couleurs. Cf. bien entendu le milieu dans lequel ces langues (ou leurs aïeules) se sont développées ... Bertrand Moraldandil a justement étudié (mais je ne crois pas que ce soit encore publié ?) la variété très « nordique » de l'elfique en matière de luminosité. Et cela me fait penser à la discussion là aussi très intéressante avec Vincent à côté : nouvel exemple comme quoi le projet de « mythologie pour l'Angleterre » d'une certaine manière ne disparaît pas vraiment, absorbé dans un projet plus vaste.

Haut de page

Section « Tolkien sur JRRVF et les médias (sites internets, presse écrite, ...) »
Fuseau « Le Trône de fer - article du Point »

Aller à la section