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Other Adûnaic names
English
Adûnaic
Tengwar

Characters
`Cw7E,~C5
Abrazân
Voronwë, a companion of Elendil (Sauron Defeated pp. 252, 290)
`C2~N5~Cl
Adûnâi
the Númenoreans, the Dúnedain (Sauron Defeated pp. 426, 429, 438)
`Cx~C5
Agân
Death personnified (Sauron Defeated pp. 426)
`Ct~C5
Amân
Manwë (Sauron Defeated pp. 357-358, 376)
`CeD5^,~B6
Aphanuzîr
Amandil, father of Elendil (Sauron Defeated pp. 389)
`C6w#,~C5
Arbazân
provisional name of Amandil, replaced by Aphanuzîr (Sauron Defeated p. 365 and passim)
`C7~N5=t^jc~V6
Arûn-Mulkhêr
Melkor (Sauron Defeated pp. 357-358, 367 and passim)
`C6=,Gt7E9Bj
Ar-Zimrahil
provisional name of queen Ar-Zimraphel (Sauron Defeated pp. 373, 387)
`CyEj~Cl
Avalâi
Powers and Elves, confused in a late blurred tradition (Sauron Defeated p. 341 and passim)
`CyEj~Ml
Avalôi
the Powers, the Valar (Sauron Defeated p. 241 and passim)
`Cy7E2~B
Avradî
Varda (Sauron Defeated pp. 428)
`Ck7Ew~Vj= `Ck7Yw~Vj
Azrabêl, Azrubêl
Eärendil (Sauron Defeated pp. 241, 305, 364 and passim)
w#j~Cl
Balâi
provisional name of Powers and Elves, replaced by Avalâi (Sauron Defeated p. 341 and passim)
`VjR2~Cl
Eledâi
the Eldar (Sauron Defeated p. 358 and passim)
`V7Y= ~V7Y
Eru, Êru
God, the One, Ilúvatar (Sauron Defeated p. 247 and passim)
`V7Y=w~V5~B
Eru-bênî
the servants of God, the Ainur (Sauron Defeated pp. 357)
`V7Y=9~B5= ~V7Y9~B5
Eru-hîn, Êruhîn
the children of God – used for Men that have rejected Mulkhêr, then for the Númenoreans (Sauron Defeated pp. 358 and passim)
x%t%jc~C2
Gimilkhâd
second son of Ar-Gimilzôr, father of Ar-Pharazôn (The Simarillion & Unfinished Tales, second part, chapter 3)
x%t%j5%1~B6
Gimilnitîr
Star-kindler, title of Varda (Sauron Defeated pp. 428)
x%t%j,~M6
Gimilzôr
Elros, son of Eärendil; later reapplied to another king (Sauron Defeated p. 380, 382, 433 & Unfinished Tales, second part, chapter 3)
x%t%j,Dx#6
Gimilzagar
second son of Ar-Belzagar (Unfinished Tales, second part, chapter 4)
~Bw#j
Îbal
a boy of Emerië, son of Ulbar (Unfinished Tales, second part, chapter 2)
`Bt7E,~M6
Imrazôr
husband of the Elf Mithrellas, founding ancestor of the House of Dol Amroth (The Peoples of Middle-earth pp. 222-223)
`B4%j,D6
Indilzar
provisional name of Elros, replaced by Gimilzôr (Sauron Defeated p. 363 and passim)
`B5,Gjw~V3
Inzilbêth
queen of Númenor, wife of Ar-Gimilzôr, mother of Ar-Inziladûn (The Silmarillion & Unfinished Tales, second part, chapter 1)
c$7~N
Kherû
provisional name of Melkor, replaced by Arûn and Mulkhêr (Sauron Defeated p. 376)
t#5#y~V
Manawê
Manwë (Sauron Defeated p. 341 and passim)
t~VjRz~M
Mêlekô
Melkor (Sauron Defeated p. 341 and passim)
5~Bj~N
Nîlû
the Moon personnified, the Man in the Moon (Sauron Defeated p. 426)
5%t~B6= 5%t7~B
Nimîr, Nimrî
the Shining, Elves (Sauron Defeated pp. 358 and passim, p. 414, 436 & The War of the Jewels p. 386)
5%t7Y,~C5
Nimruzân
provisional name of Elendil, replaced by Nimruzîr (Sauron Defeated p. 365 and passim)
5%t7Y,~B6
Nimruzîr
Elendil (Sauron Defeated p. 247 and passim)
eD7E,~B6
Pharazîr
provisional name of Eärendil, replaced by Azrabêl and then Azrubêl (Sauron Defeated p. 305, 375)
`Njw#6
Ulbar
a shepherd and mariner of Tar-Aldarion, and the father of Îbal (Unfinished Tales, second part, chapter 2)
~N7~B
Ûrî
the Sun personnified, the Lady of the Sun (Sauron Defeated p. 426)
yEj~Cl
Valâi
the Valar (Sauron Defeated p. 404)
,Dt~B5
Zamîn
an old servant of Erendis (Unfinished Tales, second part, chapter 2)
,Gx~N6
Zigûr
the Wizard, Sauron (Sauron Defeated p. 231 and passim)
Places
`Cw#6,~ChE5
Abarzâyan
provisional name of the Land of Gift, replaced by Yôzâyan (Sauron Defeated p. 378 and passim)
`C2~N5
Adûn
the West (Sauron Defeated pp. 240, 247, 312, 251)
`Cx#3H7Yd
Agathurush
the Greyflood or Gwathló, a river in Eriador (Unfinished Tales, second part, chapter 4)
`CzEj¸Ew~V3
Akallabêth
the Downfallen, Atalantë – Númenor after the Submersion (The Silmarillion & Sauron Defeated p. 247)
`Ct~C5= `Ct#3'~C5%
Amân, Amatthâni
provisional name of the Land of Gift, replaced by Zen’nabâr (Sauron Defeated p. 361 and passim)
`Ct#3'~C5~V
Amatthânê
the Land of Aman (Sauron Defeated pp. 388 and passim)
`C5#2~N5~V
Anadûnê
Westernesse (The Silmarillion & Sauron Defeated p. 247)
`C6t%5#j~V3
Arminalêth
Armenelos, city of the kings of Númenor (Sauron Defeated pp. 257 and passim)
`C3~C5~C1~V= `C3~C5~C1T
Athânâtê, Athânâti
provisional name of the land of Gift, replaced by Amatthânê (Sauron Defeated p. 305 and passim)
`CyEj¸U4~V= `CyEj¸~M5%
Avallondê, Avallôni
the Haven of the Gods, land of the Avalâi, Avallónë (Sauron Defeated p. 344 and passim, p. 241 and passim)
`C,~Nj
Azûl
the East (Sauron Defeated p. 247)
x%tjE2
Gimlad
Starwards, Elenna – the island of Númenor (Sauron Defeated p. 396)
t$5$j=1~Nw#j
Menel-Tûbal
provisional name of the Pillar of Heaven, with many variants, replaced by Minul-Târik (Sauron Defeated p. 302 and passim)
t%5^j=1E7~Bz
Minul-Tarîk
the Pillar of Heaven, Meneltarma (Sauron Defeated p. 238 and passim)
h~M,~ChE5
Yôzâyan
the Land of Gift, Andor – Númenor before the Submersion (Unfinished Tales, second part, chapter 2 & Sauron Defeated p. 241 and passim)
,F55#w~C6
Zen’nabâr
provisional name of the Land of Gift, replaced by Abarzâyan (Sauron Defeated p. 378 and passim)
,F55#t~C5
Zen’namân
provisional name of the Land of Aman, replaced by Amân and Amatthâni (Sauron Defeated pp. 380, 385)
Ships
`CxjE7'~Ct#
Aglarrâma
Castle of the Sea or Alcarondas, the ship of Ar-Pharazôn (Sauron Defeated pp. 372, 385)
7~M3G5,Gj
Rôthinzil
Foam-flower or Vingilot, the ship of Eärendil (The Silmarillion & Sauron Defeated pp. 360, 377)

Commentary
We have picked up those Adûnaic names from The Silmarillion, Unfinished Tales and the collection The History of Middle-earth. Many of them come from The Notion Club Papers and The Drowning of Anadûnê, two major writings for the development of the legend of Númenor and the Adûnaic language, composed in 1945-1946 and ultimately published in Sauron Defeated. The names were there very much in a state of flux and many of them were replaced or altered, but they still illustrate the style of Adûnaic as Tolkien imagined it at the time.

Tolkien sometimes put a macron and sometimes a circumflex on certain vowels. In the grammar Lowdham’s Report on the Adunaic Language, attached to The Drowning of Anadûnê, they are used contrastively: there are three vowel lengths, short, long and overlong, and the macron denotes long vowels whereas the circumflex is used for the overlong ones. But the difference hardly appears in the names used in the narratives, and in later texts, notably the Appendices of The Lord of the Rings and the Unfinished Tales, the circumflex is used alone. Possibly the difference was lost with time: Lowdham tells that the distinction of overlong vowels is a feature of “the older language”, suggesting that they may have disappeared later. Or Tolkien may just have decided to drop them from the language. Here, we have regularized the spelling by using the circumflex everywhere and disregarded the difference between long and overlong.

Nothing is known about Adûnaic stress, its nature and position. In the records we chose the following system: each word bears an intensity stress on the last heavy syllable, i.e. containing a long vowel or a vowel followed by more than one consonant; when there is no heavy syllable the word is stressed on the first syllable. This stress system is very loosely inspired by Classical Arabic, on the one hand in recognition of Tolkien’s self-admitted reliance on some patterns of the Semitic languages to compose his Adûnaic, on the other hand on account of the relative likeness of the vowel systems and arrangement of sounds in the two languages. But it must be well remembered that this stress system is ultimately arbitrary: we chose it for convenience and it is not supposed to reflect Tolkien’s conceptions on those matters.

Following Tolkien’s statement in Sauron Defeated p. 434 we treated v as a spelling variant of w.

The Adûnaic text is transcribed in tengwar or “letters of Fëanor” according to an adaptation of ours of the general use of the Third Age, in which the fourth row of tengwar (with raised stem and double bow) spells the prenasalized voiced stops nd, mb and ng. We made use of Måns Björkman’s typeface Tengwar Eldamar.

References
Tolkien, John Ronald Reuel. The Silmarillion. Edited by Christopher Tolkien. London: HarperCollins, 1999. 365 p. ISBN 0-261-10244-3.
Tolkien, John Ronald Reuel. Unfinished Tales of Númenor and Middle-earth. Edited by Christopher Tolkien. London: HarperCollins, 1998. 611 p. ISBN 0-261-10362-8.
Tolkien, John Ronald Reuel. Sauron Defeated – The End of the Third Age: The History of The Lord of the Rings, part four & The Notion Club Papers & The Drowning of Anadûnê. Edited by Christopher Tolkien. London: HarperCollins, 2002. 482 p. (The History of Middle-earth; IX). ISBN 0-261-10305-9.
Tolkien, John Ronald Reuel. The War of the Jewels: The Later Silmarillion, part two – The Legends of Beleriand. Edited by Christopher Tolkien. London: HarperCollins, 1995. 470 p. (The History of Middle-earth; XI). ISBN 0-261-10324-5.
Tolkien, John Ronald Reuel. The Peoples of Middle-earth. Edited by Christopher Tolkien. London: HarperCollins, 2002. 482 p. (The History of Middle-earth; XII). ISBN 0-261-10348-2.

The works of John Ronald Reuel and Christopher Tolkien are under the copyright of their authors and/or rights holders, including their publishers and the Tolkien Estate.
Quotations from other authors, editors and translators mentioned in the bibliography are under the copyright of their publishers, except for those whose copyright term has ended.
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